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  • Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

    Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minuteAfter more than a year of circling each other, Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden met on the debate stage Tuesday night in Ohio. Trump’s supporters may have been cheered by his frontal assault.




  • Chaotic first debate: Taunts overpower Trump, Biden visions

    Chaotic first debate: Taunts overpower Trump, Biden visionsThe first debate between President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden deteriorated into bitter taunts and near chaos Tuesday night as Trump repeatedly interrupted his opponent with angry — and personal — jabs that sometimes overshadowed the sharply different visions each man has for a nation facing historic crises. In the most tumultuous presidential debate in recent memory, Trump refused to condemn white supremacists who have supported him, telling one such group known as Proud Boys to “stand back, stand by.” There were also heated clashes over the president's handling of the pandemic, the integrity of the election results, deeply personal attacks about Biden's family and how the Supreme Court will shape the future of the nation’s health care.




  • Analysis: Trump leans on tone that turns off voters he needs

    Analysis: Trump leans on tone that turns off voters he needsPresident Donald Trump needed to make the first general election debate about his rival, Democrat Joe Biden. Instead, as he so often does, Trump made it about himself. The president set the tone from the start for one of the ugliest general election debates in recent memory, badgering Biden and repeatedly interrupting him.




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  • Trump to far-right extremists: 'Stand back and stand by'

    Trump to far-right extremists: 'Stand back and stand by'President Donald Trump on Tuesday didn’t clearly condemn white supremacist groups and their role in violence in some American cities this summer, branding it solely a “left-wing” problem and telling one far-right extremist group to “stand back and stand by.” “Almost everything I see is from the left wing, not from the right wing," said Trump, whose exchange with Democrat Joe Biden left the extremist group Proud Boys celebrating what some of its members saw as tacit approval. Wallace specifically mentioned Kenosha, Wisconsin, where a white teenager was charged with killing two protesters during demonstrations over the police shooting of Jacob Blake, a Black man.




  • David Attenborough leads call for world to invest $500 bln a year to protect nature


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  • AP FACT CHECK: False claims flood Trump-Biden debate

    AP FACT CHECK: False claims flood Trump-Biden debatePresident Donald Trump unleashed a torrent of fabrications and fear-mongering in a belligerent debate with Joe Biden, at one point claiming that the U.S. death toll would have been 10 times higher under the Democrat because he wanted open borders in the pandemic. Biden preached no such thing. Biden stumbled on the record at times as the angry words flew from both men on the Cleveland stage.




  • Global Insect Growth Regulators Industry


  • Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minute

    Debate Takeaways: An acrid tone from the opening minuteAfter more than a year of circling each other, Republican President Donald Trump and Democratic challenger Joe Biden met on the debate stage Tuesday night in Ohio. Trump’s supporters may have been cheered by his frontal assault.




  • Global Insoluble Dietary Fibers Industry


  • Pompeo due in Asia for talks on China, N.Korea

    Pompeo due in Asia for talks on China, N.KoreaUS Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will head next week to Japan, South Korea and Mongolia, the State Department said Tuesday, on a trip expected to focus heavily on China and North Korea.




  • Intel Chief Releases Russian-Sourced Clinton Claims

    Intel Chief Releases Russian-Sourced Clinton ClaimsThe director of National Intelligence on Tuesday declassified information from a Russian intelligence report that claimed Hillary Clinton during the 2016 race approved a plan to "stir up a scandal" tying Donald Trump to Putin and the hacking of the Democratic National Committee. In a letter to Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham, director John Ratcliffe acknowledged the U.S. intelligence community “does not know the accuracy of this allegation or the extent to which the Russian intelligence analysis may reflect exaggeration or fabrication.” A spokesman for Clinton told Politico the claim was "baseless" and the publication cited sources saying that Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Intelligence Committee had earlier rejected the claim as not factual.




  • U.S. Intel Chief Releases Russian-Sourced Clinton Claims

    U.S. Intel Chief Releases Russian-Sourced Clinton ClaimsThe director of National Intelligence on Tuesday declassified information from a Russian intelligence report that claimed Hillary Clinton during the 2016 race approved a plan to "stir up a scandal" tying Donald Trump to Putin and the hacking of the Democratic National Committee. In a letter to Senate Judiciary Committee chairman Lindsey Graham, director John Ratcliffe acknowledged the U.S. intelligence community “does not know the accuracy of this allegation or the extent to which the Russian intelligence analysis may reflect exaggeration or fabrication.” A spokesman for Clinton told Politico the claim was "baseless" and the publication cited sources saying that Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Intelligence Committee had earlier rejected the claim as not factual.




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  • UN council urges speedy halt to Nagorno-Karabakh fighting


  • Ratcliffe shares Russian allegation that Clinton 'stirred up' Trump-Russia scandal, admits it could be 'fabricated'

    Ratcliffe shares Russian allegation that Clinton 'stirred up' Trump-Russia scandal, admits it could be 'fabricated'Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe just shared the opposite of intelligence with the Senate Judiciary Committee.In a Tuesday letter, Ratcliffe let Judiciary Chair Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) know he'd declassified some Russian intelligence alleging Hillary Clinton may have launched President Trump's Russia scandal. Not that Ratcliffe, a Trump appointee who has defended the president on Russia before, had any idea if the allegation was true or not.In July 2016, U.S. intelligence picked up Russian intelligence alleging the Democratic presidential nominee "had approved a plan to stir up a scandal against" Trump by "tying him to [Russian President Vladimir] Putin and the Russian's hacking of the Democratic National Committee." Former CIA Director John Brennan apparently briefed then-President Barack Obama on the intelligence. But Ratcliffe noted the intelligence community "does not know the accuracy of this allegation," or if it contains "exaggeration or fabrication" -- probably a reason it wasn't shared earlier.> Ratcliffe just declassified to Graham a claim that Russian intel alleged that Clinton "approved a campaign plan to stir up a scandal against [Trump] by tying him to Putin and the Russians' hacking of the DNC."> > ...but says "the IC does not know the accuracy of this allegation." pic.twitter.com/tpqGmhXUMY> > -- Andrew Desiderio (@AndrewDesiderio) September 29, 2020Meanwhile, Ratcliffe has declined to release the U.S. intelligence community's annual global threat assessment -- something Trump's former anti-ISIS envoy Brett McGurk said is more important than "sketchy Russia intel chatter." > Put another way: the DNI thinks the American people should be aware of sketchy Russian intel chatter while keeping from the American people the considered USG intelligence assessment on current threats to our country--including from Russia.> > -- Brett McGurk (@brett_mcgurk) September 29, 2020More stories from theweek.com The worst presidential debate of all time Undecided voters describe Trump as a 'crackhead,' 'arrogant' in post-debate focus group Who won the debate? Early polls say Joe Biden.




  • Who thought political ads featuring Deepfake Putin and Kim trashing the US was a good idea?

    Who thought political ads featuring Deepfake Putin and Kim trashing the US was a good idea?A not-for-profit called RepresentUS, working with creative media agency Mischief @ No Fixed Address, recently used the popular Deepfake AI system to create a pair of political ads featuring actors digitally manipulated to look like Vladmir Putin and Kim Jong Un mocking the current state of US politics. Who is the target audience for this faux-deception?




  • Nigeria's independence: Six images from six decades

    Nigeria's independence: Six images from six decadesAfrica's most populous country is set to mark 60 years of independence from British rule.




  • UN: Libya rivals reach preliminary pact on prisoner exchange

    UN: Libya rivals reach preliminary pact on prisoner exchangeThe United Nations says talks between Libyan rivals in Egypt have concluded with preliminary agreements to exchange prisoners and open up air and land transit across the country's divided territory. The face-to-face military talks, which started Monday in the Red Sea resort of Hurghada, came amid international pressure on both sides of the war and their foreign backers to avert an escalation. The U.N. support mission in Libya said in a written statement that the two days of talks, conducted in “a spirit of responsibility, transparency and mutual trust," had resulted in progress on several of the lingering issues between the war's two parties.




  • They said it: Leaders at the virtual UN, in their own words

    They said it: Leaders at the virtual UN, in their own wordsHere, The Associated Press takes the opposite approach and spotlights some thoughts you might not have heard — the voices of leaders speaking at the first all-virtual U.N. General Assembly leaders meeting who might not have captured the headlines and the airtime on Saturday, the fifth day of the 2020 debate.




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  • How To Extend the Longevity of Your Wardrobe


  • Liberty disputes reports about Falwell severance payment

    Liberty disputes reports about Falwell severance paymentLiberty University said it paid its recently resigned president, Jerry Falwell Jr., the two years' base salary owed under his employment contract Tuesday. The Lynchburg, Virginia-based Christian university issued a brief statement about the compensation that did not provide an exact figure but said previous “media reports regarding the size and terms" of Falwell's severance were incorrect.




  • North Korea on virus threat: 'Under safe and stable control'

    North Korea on virus threat: 'Under safe and stable control'Kim Song, the country's U.N. ambassador, said a tightly administered anti-pandemic effort in his nation had been working. “A series of state measures are now being taken to block the virus inflow into the country, and all people adhere strictly to anti-epidemic regulations while maintaining the highest alert,” he said. Until Tuesday, all speeches at the U.N. General Assembly over the past week were virtual, delivered by world leaders in prerecorded videos from their home nations.




  • Judge allows US suit against Libyan commander to move ahead


  • Defying EU ultimatum, British MPs approve post-Brexit bill

    Defying EU ultimatum, British MPs approve post-Brexit billBritish lawmakers on Tuesday adopted a bill to regulate the UK's internal market after Brexit, defying a looming EU ultimatum as the two sides entered a final week of tense talks.




  • Global Laboratory Equipment Services Industry


  • Hezbollah leaders tell French president to change approach

    Hezbollah leaders tell French president to change approachThe leader of the militant Hezbollah group said Tuesday they still welcome the French initiative to help Lebanon out of its crisis, but said Paris has to change its approach in dealing with local factions and not blame everyone for the failure of forming a new Cabinet. French President Emmanuel Macron has been pressing Lebanese politicians to form a Cabinet made up of non-partisan specialists that can work on enacting urgent reforms to extract Lebanon from a devastating economic and financial crisis. Prime Minister-designate Mustapha Adib resigned Saturday during a political impasse that came amid Lebanon’s worst economic and financial crisis in decades — made worse by a massive explosion in Beirut in early August that killed and wounded many and caused widespread damage.




  • Verisk Elects General Vincent Brooks to Board of Directors


  • Debate veers from 'How you doing?' to 'Will you shut up?'

    Debate veers from 'How you doing?' to 'Will you shut up?'It was a chaotic and unusually bitter first presidential debate of the 2020 general election, made all the more unusual by the the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Instead, the debate played out before a socially-distanced audience of about 100 people in a makeshift debate hall built in an atrium that had been previously set up as an emergency hospital for patients with COVID-19. Trump came out of the gate looking to challenge Biden and badgered him throughout the debate, drawing a string of rejoinders from the Democrat, including a plea to “just shush for a minute” at the half-hour mark.




  • Justice Ginsburg buried at Arlington in private ceremony

    Justice Ginsburg buried at Arlington in private ceremonySupreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was buried Tuesday in a private ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery, laid to rest beside her husband and near some of her former colleagues on the court. Washington last week honored the 87-year-old Ginsburg, who died Sept. 18, with two days where the public could view her casket at the top of the Supreme Court's steps and pay their respects. On Friday, the women's rights trailblazer and second woman to join the high court lay in state at the U.S. Capitol, the first woman to do so.




  • WHO to probe 'sexual exploitation' by aid workers in DR Congo

    WHO to probe 'sexual exploitation' by aid workers in DR CongoThe health body's "robust" investigation will cover allegations against aid workers tackling Ebola.




  • UK's Brexit treaty override powers approved by parliament's lower house


  • Britain's trade relationship with China 'under threat' after MPs' Uighur genocide proposal

    Britain's trade relationship with China 'under threat' after MPs' Uighur genocide proposalBritain’s trade relationship with China is under threat after MPs proposed Uighurs should be allowed to petition UK court for genocide ruling. Sir Iain Duncan Smith, the co-founder of the Inter-Parliamentary Alliance on China which is campaigning to stop the human rights abuses of the Uighur community in China’s Xinjiang province, told the Daily Telegraph that a cross party group of MPs have joined forces to stop doing trade with countries accused of genocide. Sir Iain, the former Conservative Party leader, said the MPs had “proposed an amendment to the trade bill which states that if it is deemed that a country is practicing genocide then the trade arrangements with that country should not stand”. It is anticipated that the amendment to the trade bill, which was tabled at the weekend and adds the need for a high court judge to make a pre-determination on genocide, will be passed in the Lords. Sir Iain previously told this newspaper he was convinced that the Chinese government was “performing the systematic eradication of the Uighur people”. It comes after Tory MP Nus Ghani earlier this month launched an inquiry with the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Committee (beis) exploring how it can look at the UK Uighur supply chain. Tom Tugendhat, chairman of the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee, also launched an inquiry into how best discourage private sector companies from contributing to human rights abuses of the Uighur people. Mr Tugendhat previously warned in The Telegraph that “the mass detention of Uighurs in Xinjiang” which he said “has horrifying echoes of the 1930s”. “We now have clear, undeniable evidence of the persecution of more than one million people in these so-called re-education camps, with credible reports of physical abuse, forced sterilisation, filthy living conditions and a state-led programme of indoctrination,” he said. China has come under scrutiny over its treatment of Uighur Muslims and claims of alleged forced-labour abuses in Xinjiang, where the United Nations cites credible reports as saying one million Muslims have been held in camps. China has repeatedly denied mistreating Uighurs and says the camps are vocational training centres that are needed to tackle extremism, accusing what it calls anti-China forces of smearing its Xinjiang policy. In July, Washington imposed sanctions on Chinese officials over alleged human rights abuses against Uighurs under the Global Magnitsky Act, which allows the US government to target human rights violators by freezing any US assets, banning U.S. travel and prohibiting Americans from doing business with them.




  • Zimbabwe: Elephants die from 'bacterial disease'

    Zimbabwe: Elephants die from 'bacterial disease'More than 30 elephants were found lying on their stomachs, according to wildlife officials.




  • Auschwitz director offers to serve time in place of 13-year-old Nigerian sentenced to 10 years for blasphemy

    Auschwitz director offers to serve time in place of 13-year-old Nigerian sentenced to 10 years for blasphemyThe director of the Auschwitz Memorial in Poland has offered to serve time for a Nigerian child who was convicted of blasphemy and ordered to spend ten years in prison by a Sharia court . In an open letter, Piotr Cywinski asked Nigeria’s President to intervene and pardon 13-year-old Omar Farouq for the conviction. “As the director of the Auschwitz memorial, which commemorates the victims and preserves the remains of the German Nazi concentration and extermination camps, where children were imprisoned and murdered, I cannot remain indifferent to this disgraceful sentence for humanity,” he wrote. Omar Farouq was arrested earlier this year by religious police in Kano, Nigeria’s second-largest city, after he had a ‘blasphemous’ conversation with an older man. His conviction by a religious court has provoked condemnation by the United Nations and global human rights groups. Mr Cywinski told The Telegraph that he felt he had to act when he heard about Omar. “When I heard about this story last week, I remembered that [Nigeria’s] President Buhari visited Auschwitz in 2018. So I thought that maybe a voice coming from this difficult place would have some effect on him... I have kids that age. "There are some times we have to stop our own silence and try to do something. It’s not enough to just like something on Facebook or retweet it.” Mr Cywinski added that since he sent the letter last week, no one from the government had responded yet. Kola Alapinni, Omar’s lawyer, told The Telegraph that the adolescent has been held in a prison for adults and not been allowed to see any legal representation. If Omar had been older, Mr Alapinni says, he would have been sentenced to death. At a federal level, Nigeria is a secular state. But 12 of the country’s northern Muslim-dominated states have a Sharia system running in parallel to the secular courts. These courts can only try Muslims and regularly serve out medieval-style punishments. Mr Alapinni, a graduate of the University of Essex and a secularist campaigner, says he will keep fighting Omar’s corner. “Section 10 of the constitution says Nigeria is a secular state. We are not Iran; we are no Saudi Arabia; we are not the Vatican. We are a multi-religious state with freedom of thought, expression and religion enshrined in the constitution,” he says. “This should not be happening.”




  • COVID-19 cases rising among US children as schools reopen

    COVID-19 cases rising among US children as schools reopenAfter preying heavily on the elderly in the spring, the coronavirus is increasingly infecting American children and teens in a trend authorities say appears fueled by school reopenings and the resumption of sports, playdates and other activities. Children of all ages now make up 10% of all U.S cases, up from 2% in April, the American Academy of Pediatrics reported Tuesday. About two times more teens were infected than younger children, the CDC report said.




  • Israeli PM to UN: Hezbollah storing missiles in Beirut

    Israeli PM to UN: Hezbollah storing missiles in BeirutIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Tuesday accused the Lebanese militant group Hezbollah of maintaining a "secret arms depot" in a residential neighborhood of Beirut, warning it could cause another tragic explosion in the Lebanese capital. Hezbollah denied the allegations and invited international and local media to immediately visit the site, where they found a small factory housing heavy machinery but no weapons. In an address to the U.N. General Assembly, Netanyahu pointed to maps purportedly showing the missile depot's location next to a gas company and residential housing, not far from Beirut's international airport.




  • Nigeria COVID-19 Response: UNICEF Contributes Medical Supplies in collaboration with IHS Nigeria

    Nigeria COVID-19 Response: UNICEF Contributes Medical Supplies in collaboration with IHS NigeriaUnited Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) received the delivery of 115,800 COVID-19 test kits to support the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic in Nigeria. These supplies were funded by IHS Nigeria, the Nigerian subsidiary of IHS Towers.




  • Hezbollah's Nasrallah: Israeli PM is lying about group's missile sites


  • Lawyer for Flynn says she updated Trump on status of case

    Lawyer for Flynn says she updated Trump on status of caseA lawyer for former Trump administration national security adviser Michael Flynn told a judge Tuesday that she recently updated President Donald Trump on the case and asked him not to issue a pardon for her client. The attorney, Sidney Powell, was initially reluctant to discuss her conversations with the president or the White House, saying she believed they were protected by executive privilege. Attorney General William Barr, who appointed a U.S. attorney from Missouri to investigate the handling of the case, moved in May to dismiss the case despite Flynn's own guilty plea in the Russia investigation.




  • Global Long-Term Care Industry


  • Germany limits public gatherings in virus-affected areas

    Germany limits public gatherings in virus-affected areasGermany has ordered new restrictions to contain a second wave of the coronavirus, but stopped far short of the sort of measures seen in the UK. Angela Merkel and regional leaders agreed not to impose a new lockdown or a blanket limit on gatherings like the UK’s “rule of six”. Instead public gatherings will be limited to 25, but only in areas where the rate of infection rises over government safety limits. And even in the worst affected areas, there will be no legal limit on how many people can meet in private homes. “The rising number of coronavirus infections is a cause for concern,” Angela Merkel told a press conference. “We want to act in a regionally specific, targeted manner. Another lockdown must be prevented at all costs. “Our priority is to protect the economy and keep schools open for children. When it comes to everything else, we shall have to see what we can manage.” Germany recorded its highest daily increase in infections since April on Saturday, with 2,507, but the infection rate remains far lower than in the UK or most other major European countries. “We got through the summer well, but difficult times lie ahead in the autumn and winter,” Mrs Merkel said. “We can meet this with the right measures. These will only succeed if citizens are willing to follow the rules so that the epidemic does not spread any further.” The new rules come after it was leaked to the German press that Mrs Merkel was seriously worried at the rising infection rate in Germany and had privately warned party colleagues that the country “could see 19,200 cases a day by Christmas”. But under Germany’s federal system the chancellor’s power to impose lockdowns and other restrictions is severely limited.




  • A creepy presidential debate ad shows a deepfake of Putin telling Americans they're ruining their own democracy

    A creepy presidential debate ad shows a deepfake of Putin telling Americans they're ruining their own democracyIn an ad campaign from non-profit RepresentUs, deepfakes of Kim Jong-un and Vladimir Putin warn Americans that they're ruining their own democracy.




  • Stockpile pet food and plan emergency Brexit airlifts, animal charities tell Government

    Stockpile pet food and plan emergency Brexit airlifts, animal charities tell GovernmentBritain must stockpile pet food and livestock feed and plan for airlifts of medical supplies to protect animals from Brexit chaos next year, leading charities will warn on Wednesday. The end of the Brexit transition period on December 31 could cause shortages of food for pets and livestock as well as other vital supplies, the 12 campaign groups said. Even if there is a trade deal, delays and queues are expected at key ports such as Dover. Disruption to medical supplies would not only be “potentially devastating” for individual animals but make it harder to “control disease outbreaks,” the 12 charities told Environment Secretary George Eustice in a letter exclusively obtained by the Telegraph. “We believe central and devolved governments need to make contingency plans for the stockpiling of veterinary medicines and animal feed,” the charities, who are part of the UK-EU animal welfare taskforce, said. “Central government should further explore the use of air freight [...] to mitigate risks associated with veterinary medicine availability issues,” the taskforce said, raising the prospect of emergency airlifts of supplies from the EU. Some government estimates for a no deal Brexit estimate queues of up to 7,000 lorries stretching into Kent. The animal welfare groups called for dedicated rest areas for animals along motorways, particularly the M20 in Kent, and at the ports themselves. The charities, which included the RSPCA and Animal Defenders International, said that the UK imports two thirds of its animal feed and feed ingredients from the EU. It imports all of its pet food from the EU, they said, or makes it with EU ingredients. They called for a communication campaign for pet owners to ensure they had enough food for their animals. The UK government and the governments of Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland should build up reserves of farmed animal feed in case of supply chain disruption, they said. A minimum of four to 12 week’s supplies of medicines needed to be stockpiled, the charities said. The final scheduled round of Brexit trade negotiations began on Tuesday in Brussels amid cautious optimism that a deal could be struck by the October 15 EU Summit, if both sides compromise. Even if a trade deal is agreed, there will need to be more border checks than now because the UK will have left the Single Market and Customs Union. The change will be particularly pronounced in Northern Ireland, which will continue to be subject to EU animal health rules after the end of the transition period. That is necessary to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland but it means that Northern Irish cats, dogs and ferrets will have different pet passports to those on the British mainland. “Pet passports for cats, dogs and ferrets will be required as standard when crossing the Irish Sea,” the charities said in their letter before calling for updated travel advice for owners. The Telegraph understands that EU officials are in the process of designing the Northern Irish pet passport. It is expected to be blue and will not have any reference to the United Kingdom on it. British cats, dogs and ferrets will have to show a UK pet passport before travelling to Northern Ireland. That will be designed by British officials, if the EU lists the UK as a country where it is safe for pets to visit from.




  • Global Low Temperature Coatings Industry


  • The Latest: Trump casts election doubts, Biden urges voting

    The Latest: Trump casts election doubts, Biden urges votingPresident Donald Trump and Democrat Joe Biden are painting a very different picture of the reliability of the upcoming election. Biden urged voters to cast their ballots and not be intimidated by Trump’s suggestions he might not accept a loss. Trump has been groundlessly casting doubt on the reliability of mail ballots and elections in general.





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