Students for Democracy - uncensored international political forums
  StudentsforDemocracy home     StudentsforDemocracy - forums     StudentsforDemocracy - guestbook  
Register   Login  
 Main Menu

Warning: This text and the email address is not visible in a browser! Do not ever send any emails to:
advcwfda@contact.studentsfordemocracy.org


 Latest Picture


 SfD Top Posters
No avatar
EngineerSoldier (12240)

SfD's Top-Poster #2
odin (9239)

SfD's Top-Poster #3
tude dog (7685)

SfD's Top-Poster #4
twiw (7595)

SfD's Top-Poster #5
headrock (6554)


 SfD Site Stats
People Online:  35
Memberships: 1156

Newest Members:
wolly (7/28/2020)
yoriry (7/14/2020)
karanprakash30 (7/10/2020)
5x3ghrme (7/9/2020)
Ouissam (7/7/2020)

 Please donate!
Newest Link from Studentfordemocracys Link Page

Save the children

War child charity 

 
StudentsforDemocracy World News

Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines 
  • AP PHOTOS: Beirut images show shattered, dust-covered city

    AP PHOTOS:  Beirut images show shattered, dust-covered cityThe aftermath of a massive explosion in the Lebanese capital of Beirut shows a shattered city covered in dust and debris. The blast sent a mushroom cloud into the sky, killed more than 100 people and injured thousands, with more bodies probably buried in the rubble. A photo of a damaged hospital room offered a chilling scene.




  • Global High Pressure Grinding Rollers Industry


  • Virus testing in the US is dropping, even as deaths mount

    Virus testing in the US is dropping, even as deaths mountU.S. testing for the coronavirus is dropping even as infections remain high and the death toll rises by more than 1,000 a day, a worrisome trend that officials attribute largely to Americans getting discouraged over having to wait hours to get a test and days or weeks to find out the results. An Associated Press analysis found that the number of tests per day slid 3.6% over the past two weeks to 750,000, with the count falling in 22 states. “There’s a sense of desperation that we need to do something else,” said Dr. Ashish Jha, director of Harvard’s Global Health Institute.




  • Biden won't go to Milwaukee to accept Democratic nomination

    Biden won't go to Milwaukee to accept Democratic nominationJoe Biden will not travel to Milwaukee to accept the Democratic presidential nomination because of concerns over the coronavirus, party officials said Wednesday, signaling a move to a convention that essentially has become entirely virtual. It is the latest example of the pandemic’s sweeping effects on the 2020 presidential election and the latest blow to traditional party nominating conventions that historically have marked the start of fall general election campaigns. “From the very beginning of this pandemic, we put the health and safety of the American people first,” said Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez.




  • Global Hospital Acquired Infection Control Industry


  • It’s Time to Rethink Our Russia Policy


  • The tragedy in Beirut

    The tragedy in BeirutMillions of people around the world reacted with horror to footage of a massive explosion that killed dozens of people and injured thousands more in Beirut on Tuesday. It is still too early to say what caused the blast, which Lebanese authorities attributed to a fire igniting explosive materials stored in a "dangerous warehouse." It has been reported that nearly 3,000 tons of ammonium nitrate had been impounded in 2014 and left in storage there. An early statement sourced to an unnamed official denied Israeli involvement; Gabi Ashkenazi, Israel's foreign minister, later claimed that the explosion was most likely an accident.What we do know is that the blast will only exacerbate one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. Never mind the ongoing pandemic. Well before COVID-19 was on the lips of a single person outside Wuhan, Lebanon's debt-to-GDP ratio was the third highest in the world. The unemployment rate is over 30 percent. Its currency is being exchanged for American dollars on the black market at more than four times the official exchange. Half of the population lives in poverty. Prices of food and other goods have been increasing at an unsustainable rate, and there are severe shortages of fuel. Electricity works two or three hours a day, including on airport runways. The once-praised head of the country's central bank has been caught in what is essentially the state-run equivalent of a Ponzi scheme.The explosion also comes as a verdict is expected in the trial of four men who have been accused of murdering Rafik Hariri, the prime minister of Lebanon who died in a car bomb incident in 2005. Hariri, who first came into office in 1992, was instrumental in the drafting of the agreement that ended the Lebanese Civil War of 1975-1990, which killed 120,000 people and led to the emigration of nearly a million others. Almost immediately following his death the country returned to war again, this time with Israel.In recent years the situation in Lebanon has gone mostly unremarked upon in the United States, at least outside of our sizable Lebanese diaspora. Americans are an inward-facing people at the best of times; during the last six months of lockdowns, economic downturn, civil unrest, and rising crime it is almost unimaginable that the horror in Lebanon would have captured our attention at all had it not been for videos of Tuesday's explosions.This is not to suggest that there are any straightforward solutions to Lebanon's problems or that increased American attention to the country or the region more generally would improve things. (The last two decades have shown us how effective we are in the Middle East and Central Asia when we put our thinking caps on.) Whatever our State Department or the European Union might insist in their designations, Hezbollah, the Iran-backed militia, enjoys widespread support and considerable political influence in Lebanon. The idea that destroying the organization is either possible or desirable should be dismissed out of hand.Instead the only course of action available at present is the one already being proposed by leaders of countries around the world: humanitarian aid, including emergency food and medical supplies, and eventually some kind of bailout of Lebanon's devastated economy that could perhaps be offered in exchange for a reduction in Hezbollah's stock of weapons. Such a relief package would almost certainly have to sidestep the conditions usually imposed by the International Monetary Fund and similar groups regarding transparency, which are unlikely to be adhered to even if they are somehow agreed upon. If this seems inadequate to the scale of the misery there, we should remember that the vast majority of those who will call for more sweeping actions in the days and months to come were not even aware of the crisis 24 hours ago.More stories from theweek.com Why Obama still drives Republicans nuts Seven states announce bipartisan agreement to expand COVID-19 testing Trump's aides are reportedly promising him re-election if he 'nukes' his China trade deal




  • Turkey sends rescue and medical teams after Beirut explosion


  • Global Hydraulic Dosing Pumps Industry


  • Beirut Explosions Create a Dilemma for the World


  • Videos show explosion in N.Korean town - reports


  • Global Hydraulic Fluids Industry


  • A shattered Beirut emerges from the rubble stunned, wounded

    A shattered Beirut emerges from the rubble stunned, woundedResidents of Beirut —stunned, sleepless and stoic — emerged Wednesday from the aftermath of a catastrophic explosion searching for missing relatives, bandaging their wounds and retrieving what's left of their homes. The sound of ambulance sirens and the shoveling of glass and rubble could be heard across the Lebanese capital.




  • China Targets U.S. Universities And Colleges For Spying

    China Targets U.S. Universities And Colleges For SpyingEvanina, the country’s top counterintelligence official, tells Newsy China — which vows to be the world’s top superpower by 2049 — poses a threat far greater than Russia or Iran. An American scientist who participates in China’s Thousand Talents program told Newsy it’s wrong for researchers to hide their earnings and affiliations, but that fears of the program being a spy front are overblown — because, quote, “Trump is after China.”




  • As Schools Reopen, Intelligence Officials Say China Spying Looms Large

    As Schools Reopen, Intelligence Officials Say China Spying Looms LargeEvanina, the country’s top counterintelligence official, tells Newsy China — which vows to be the world’s top superpower by 2049 — poses a threat far greater than Russia or Iran. An American scientist who participates in China’s Thousand Talents program told Newsy it’s wrong for researchers to hide their earnings and affiliations, but that fears of the program being a spy front are overblown — because, quote, “Trump is after China.”




  • MobiusTrend: Opportunities Brought by Air Imaging Holographic Technologies


  • Letter from Africa: How African generosity dried a teacher's tears

    Letter from Africa: How African generosity dried a teacher's tearsStrangers helped a Nigerian teacher, left without money because of coronavirus, get back on his feet.




  • Poop scoop: Satellite images reveal Antarctic penguin haunts

    Poop scoop: Satellite images reveal Antarctic penguin hauntsBritish scientists say there are more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than previously thought based on evidence of bird droppings spotted from space. A study published Wednesday by scientists at the British Antarctic Survey counted 61 emperor penguin colonies dotted around the southernmost continent, 11 more than the number previously confirmed. The majestic emperor penguin breeds in remote areas where temperatures can drop as low as minus 50 degrees Celsius (minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit).




  • Tribe, economy, even cemeteries hurt as virus hits Choctaws

    Tribe, economy, even cemeteries hurt as virus hits ChoctawsWhen Sharon Taylor died of coronavirus, her family — standing apart, wearing masks — sang her favorite hymns at her graveside, next to a tiny headstone for her stillborn daughter, buried 26 years ago. Holy Rosary is one of the only cemeteries in this Choctaw Indian family’s community, and it’s running out of space — a sign of the virus’s massive toll on the Choctaw people. As confirmed coronavirus cases skyrocket in Mississippi, the state’s only federally recognized American Indian tribe has been devastated.




  • Israeli military sets up coronavirus task force


  • Hezbollah Will Not Escape Blame For Beirut

    Hezbollah Will Not Escape Blame For Beirut(Bloomberg Opinion) -- As if the Lebanese haven’t suffered enough. For months, they have been caught between an economic meltdown, crumbling public services, and a surging pandemic. Now they must count the dead and survey the extensive damage to their capital after two giant explosions on Tuesday.The blasts, especially the second, were so huge they were reportedly heard and felt in Cyprus. At least 100 people are reported to have been killed—that number will almost certainly rise—and thousands injured. A large expanse of the port and its immediate neighborhood lies in smoking ruin; miles away, streets are full of shattered glass.Prime Minister Hassan Diab’s government says the explosions were caused when careless welding ignited about 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate, a highly combustible material used as fertilizer and for bomb-making. By comparison, Timothy McVeigh used about 2.4 tons of the same chemical in the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing. The 2015 disaster in the Chinese city of Tianjin was caused by the explosion of 800 tons of ammonium nitrate.The equivalent of 2,000 Oklahoma City-sized bombs could indeed account for the devastation and the reddish mushroom cloud that plumed gaudily over the Beirut port. But it doesn’t mean Lebanese will simply accept that the explosion was an unavoidable, force majeure event.Assuming the official account holds up, the disaster again exposes the rot that is destroying the country—an especially corrosive mix of corruption, ineptitude and malign intentions.The ammonium nitrate was apparently seized in 2013 from a Moldovan-flagged ship traveling from Georgia to Mozambique. But someone—who, we don’t yet know—brought it into Beirut; instead of returning, auctioning or disposing of it, the port management inexcusably allowed it to be stored there for years.There are no prizes for guessing who in Lebanon might be interested in keeping such vast quantities of explosive material close at hand. The U.S. Treasury and Israel both believe Hezbollah controls many of Beirut’s port facilities.Diab, whose government is entirely dependent on political support from Hezbollah and its Maronite Christian allies, has vowed to hold those responsible to account. More than likely, some minor officials will be fingered for permitting improper storage of highly dangerous material.Iran-backed Hezbollah, with its large and well-armed militia as well as its political hold on the prime minister, has nothing to fear from the state. But it will not escape public opprobrium: Most Lebanese will assume the ammonium nitrate belonged to the militia, for use in Syria and against Israel.Why the chemicals exploded is another matter, rich with possibilities of conjecture. In the court of public opinion, the usual suspects will be rounded up from the ongoing shadow war between Iran and Hezbollah on one side and Israel on the other. President Donald Trump, who can be relied upon to make everything worse, speculated it was a deliberate attack. This will be picked up and amplified by conspiracy theorists in the Middle East.But suspicions of Hezbollah’s culpability will intensify on Friday when a United Nations special tribunal for Lebanon that has been looking into the 2005 assassination of former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri is expected to issue verdicts in cases against four Hezbollah cadres being tried in absentia. The men are in hiding, and have not been seen in years; even if they are found guilty, no one expects them to be handed over. Hariri, remember, was killed in a massive blast.A guilty verdict would increase domestic pressure on Hezbollah, its allies and the government. When Lebanese have finished mourning their dead, anger will return—the kind that fueled the massive street demonstrations that brought down Diab’s predecessor last October.Even without the Beirut blasts, the timing of the verdict would have been awkward for Diab, who is struggling to negotiate an economic bailout with the International Monetary Fund: Among the hurdles is Hezbollah’s resistance to the necessary reforms.  Hezbollah finds itself uncomfortably positioned as the principal backer of the government presiding over a thoroughgoing collapse of the Lebanese state and society. It will not easily shake off blame for the Beirut blast, or for the Hariri assassination. Even in this country that has suffered so much and for so long, the latest of Lebanon’s tragedies will not soon be forgotten, nor its perpetrators forgiven.This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Hussein Ibish is a senior resident scholar at the Arab Gulf States Institute in Washington. For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinionSubscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.©2020 Bloomberg L.P.




  • World responds to Lebanon's plight, France's Macron to visit

    World responds to Lebanon's plight, France's Macron to visitAs stunned Lebanese rescuers counted the dead and combed rubble for signs of life a day after a huge explosion shattered swaths of Beirut, nations near and far pledged Wednesday that the country, already trapped in a deep economic crisis, would not be left alone. From Australia to Indonesia to Europe and the United States, countries readied to send in aid and search teams. Reflecting both the gravity of the disaster and France's special relationship with its former protectorate, French President Emmanuel Macron was to visit Lebanon Thursday.




  • Districts go round and round on school bus reopening plans

    Districts go round and round on school bus reopening plansSchool districts nationwide puzzling over how to safely educate children during a pandemic have a more immediate challenge — getting 26 million bus-riding students there in the first place. Few challenges are proving to be more daunting than figuring out how to maintain social distance on school buses. Should students with COVID-19 symptoms be isolated at the front of the school bus?




  • Medtronic Announces Comprehensive U.S. Launch of New InterStim™ Micro Neurostimulator


  • WHO says N.Korea's COVID-19 test results for first suspected case 'inconclusive'


  • Egypt, Sudan suspend talks with Ethiopia over disputed dam

    Egypt, Sudan suspend talks with Ethiopia over disputed damEgypt and Sudan suspended talks with Ethiopia after it proposed linking a deal on its newly constructed reservoir and giant hydroelectric dam to a broader agreement about the Blue Nile waters that would replace a colonial-era accord with Britain. The African Union-led talks among the three key Nile basin countries are trying to resolve a years-long dispute over Ethiopia's construction of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile.




  • City streets drain of life in Australia's toughest lockdown

    City streets drain of life in Australia's toughest lockdownMelbourne’s usually vibrant downtown streets were draining of signs of life on Wednesday on the eve of Australia’s toughest-ever pandemic restrictions coming into force. Many of the stylish boutiques and eateries in a city dubbed Australia’s Hipster Capital that prides itself on superior coffee had already closed their doors ahead of a ban on non-essential businesses that will throw 250,000 people out of work from Thursday. The closing down of Australia’s second-largest city, which usually accounts for a quarter of the nation’s economic activity, also coincided with frenetic preparation.




  • Video suggests explosions in North Korean city near China

    Video suggests explosions in North Korean city near ChinaA video obtained by The Associated Press shows plumes of black smoke rising from a North Korean city near the border with China amid reports that deadly explosions occurred there earlier this week. There has been no official word from North Korea or China about what happened in the North Korean city of Hyesan on Monday. The video acquired by AP shows orange flames and black smoke shooting into the sky from Hyesan as loud explosion-like sounds are heard.




  • Fireworks, ammonium nitrate likely fueled Beirut explosion

    Fireworks, ammonium nitrate likely fueled Beirut explosionFireworks and ammonium nitrate appear to have been the fuel that ignited a massive explosion that rocked the Lebanese capital of Beirut, experts and videos of the blast suggest. The scale of the damage — from the epicenter of the explosion at the port of Beirut to the windows blown out kilometers (miles) away — resembles other blasts involving the chemical compound commonly used as an agricultural fertilizer.




  • Global Industrial Overload Relays Industry


  • The Latest: UN-backed Lebanon tribunal delays verdicts

    The Latest: UN-backed Lebanon tribunal delays verdictsThe move was a mark of respect to victims of the devastating explosion that rocked Beirut late Tuesday. The verdicts were to have been read out in the Special Tribunal for Lebanon’s courtroom in the Netherlands on Friday, but will now be delivered on Aug. 18. In a statement, the tribunal says the decision to delay Friday’s court hearing was made “out of respect for the countless victims of the devastating explosion that shook Beirut on Aug. 4” and the three days of public mourning announced in Lebanon.




  • UN pledges to help Mali rebuild heritage sites damaged in conflict

    UN pledges to help Mali rebuild heritage sites damaged in conflictParts of the life and culture of the country's Land of the Dogon have been destroyed in conflict.




  • Negligence suspected in Beirut blast involving chemicals

    Negligence suspected in Beirut blast involving chemicalsInvestigators began searching through the wreckage of Beirut’s port Wednesday for clues to the cause of the massive explosion that ripped across the Lebanese capital, and the government ordered port officials put under house arrest amid speculation that negligence was to blame. The investigation is focusing on how 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate, a highly explosive chemical used in fertilizers, came to be stored at the facility for six years, and why nothing was done about it. International aid flights began to arrive as Lebanon’s leaders struggled to deal with the shocking aftermath of Tuesday’s blast, crippled by an economic crisis and facing a public that blames chronic mismanagement and corruption among the ruling elite for the disaster.




  • Lives Lost: Parents hoped baby Kobe would play basketball

    Lives Lost: Parents hoped baby Kobe would play basketballHe was heralded in the Philippines as the country’s youngest COVID-19 survivor, a baby who’d become infected with and conquered the coronavirus during his first 16 days of life. To Ronnel Manjares and Trisha May Noche, he was Kobe Christ, their second child. Noche wanted her son to grow up playing basketball, just like his father.




  • Protest leader Bush ousts 20-year US Rep. Clay in Missouri

    Protest leader Bush ousts 20-year US Rep. Clay in MissouriCori Bush, a onetime homeless woman who led protests following a white police officer's fatal shooting of a Black 18-year-old in Ferguson, ousted longtime Rep. William Lacy Clay Tuesday in Missouri's Democratic primary, ending a political dynasty that has spanned more than a half-century. Bush's victory came in a rematch of 2018, when she failed to capitalize on a national Democratic wave that favored political newcomers such as Bush’s friend, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.




  • Chasm grows between Trump and government coronavirus experts

    Chasm grows between Trump and government coronavirus expertsIn the early days of the coronavirus crisis, President Donald Trump was flanked in the White House briefing room by a team of public health experts in a seeming portrait of unity to confront the disease that was ravaging the globe. Trump and his political advisers insist that the United States has no rival in its response to the pandemic. “Right now, I think it’s under control,” Trump said during an interview with Axios.




  • 'We are no less American': Deaths pile up on Texas border

    'We are no less American': Deaths pile up on Texas borderWhen labor pains signaled that Clarissa Muñoz was at last going to be a mom, she jumped in a car and headed two hours down the Texas border into one of the nation's most dire coronavirus hot spots. Hours later, Muñoz was granted just a few seconds to lay eyes, but no hands, on her first born, who was quickly whisked away. For nearly a month, this borderland of 2 million people in South Texas pleaded for a field hospital, but not until Tuesday was one ready and accepting patients.




  • Minneapolis commission takes up proposal to disband police

    Minneapolis commission takes up proposal to disband policeA Minneapolis commission is expected to take up a proposed amendment Wednesday that would dismantle the city’s Police Department in the wake of George Floyd's death and replace it with a new public safety department. A majority of the City Council backs the idea, with supporters saying it would do away with a troubled department that has resisted change, and replace it with a more “holistic” and public health-oriented approach to public safety. The 15-member volunteer commission could approve the proposal; reject it; propose a substitute or ask for more time to review it.




  • US sending highest official to Taiwan since ties cut in 1979

    US sending highest official to Taiwan since ties cut in 1979The U.S. secretary of Health and Human Services is scheduled to visit Taiwan in coming days in the highest-level visit by an American Cabinet official since the break in formal diplomatic relations between Washington and Taipei in 1979. The visit by Alex Azar, and especially a planned meeting with Taiwan’s president, will likely create new friction between the U.S. and China, which claims Taiwan as its own territory to be annexed by force if necessary.




  • Tory MPs urge Government action to avoid power 'vacuum' developing in Lebanon

    Tory MPs urge Government action to avoid power 'vacuum' developing in LebanonCoronavirus latest news: Pubs, cafes, restaurants ordered shut in Aberdeen after Covid-19 cluster emerges Ammonium nitrate: what is it and why did it cause the blast in Beirut? Analysis: Why Beirut’s explosion was years in the making Rishi Sunak could hike business rates for 'most valuable properties' Russian hackers stole documents from Liam Fox's email account Subscribe to The Telegraph, free for one month Conservative MPs have urged the Government to take long-term strategic action in Lebanon, warning of a power "vacuum" that could help groups who "pose a threat" to the West. Tom Tugendhat, the chair of the Foreign Affairs Committee, told BBC Radio 4's World At One that the UK had been "at the forefront of helping Lebanon for the last 10 years", playing a vital supporting role as the Middle Eastern country offered "extraordinary" levels of support to more than two million Syrian refugees. "It is right that we step up once again," the MP for Tonbridge and Malling added. "To really make this moment count." "We have left Lebanon alone for too long." This was echoed by fellow Conservative, Tobias Ellwood, who blamed "dwindling international support" for allowing countries such as Iran to develop "proxy" power in Lebanon. Beyond urgent immediate support, the Defence Committee chair said there were "bigger questions about our geo-strategic engagement in the Middle East". He told Sky News: "We have to recognise that we have taken a step back and when you leave a vacuum it quickly gets filled by people pursuing very different agendas." Mr Ellwood added: "When there is poor governance... that is exactly where terrorist groups are able to retrain, regroup, rearm and then pose threat not just to that country as well but to us as well." "In our interest to look at this carefully and work with our allies to say what more can we do to support Lebanon." Ministers have pledged "technical and financial" support for the country, which is reeling from a massive explosion by Beirut port yesterday evening, in which at least 100 people have been killed. Follow the latest updates below.




  • Quarantine fiasco allowed 10,000 infected arrivals into the UK

    Quarantine fiasco allowed 10,000 infected arrivals into the UKFailure to introduce quarantine at the start of the outbreak saw up to 10,000 infected people enter the UK, accelerating the spread of disease, an investigation by MPs have said. The all-party home affairs committee today (Wed) said the Government’s “inexplicable” decision to lift restrictions on some one million people who arrived in the UK between March 13 and lockdown on March 23 contributed to the pace and scale of the Covid-19 outbreak in Britain They said this “highly unusual approach” to the pandemic contrasted with other countries from Singapore and New Zealand to Spain which were at the time introducing more comprehensive measures including quarantine and self-isolation for international arrivals. Leading experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine told the MPs that they calculated up to 10,000 infected people largely from Spain, France and Italy - including families returning from half-term breaks - imported Covid-19 into the UK. This was confirmed by Sir Patrick Vallance, the Government's chief scientific officer, who pointed to evidence that hundreds of different strains of Covid-19 were brought into the UK after the Government abandoned special measures for international arrivals on March 13. "The UK's experience of Covid-19 has been far worse as a result of the Government's decision not to require quarantine during March, which would have reduced the number of imported infections," said the MPs. “Evidence shows it is highly likely that uncontrolled importations of the virus from European countries contributed to the rapid increase in the spread of the virus in mid-March, and the overall scale of the outbreak in the UK. “The failure to have any special border measures during this period was a serious mistake that significantly increased both the pace and the scale of the epidemic in the UK, and meant that many more people caught COVID-19.” From mid February until March 13, the Government told arrivals from countries including China, Iran and South Korea to self-isolate even if asymptomatic. A second category of countries such as Japan, Malaysia and Northern Italy recommended self-isolation if people developed symptoms. These were abandoned in favour of voluntary “stay at home” guidance until full, legally-enforced lockdown was introduced on March 23. The committee, however, said it “did not accept the argument that the introduction of voluntary ‘stay at home’ guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection on 13 March was enough reason to withdraw all guidance for returning travellers or visitors. “Nor do we accept that falling numbers of arrivals justified the lifting of border measures in mid-March.” The committee said it was "very critical" of the lack of transparency over Government border decisions. It raised concerns about the scientific advice being provided and said ministers appeared to make decisions without "critical information" being available. It was still not clear who was responsible for some decisions and on what basis they were being made, and no Cabinet minister or official has so far been able to provide an explanation, according to the report. The committee said it had been "unable to find any scientific basis or analysis behind the decision to lift border controls on March 13", which it branded "unacceptable" after making nine different formal requests for information and despite Government promises to make this available. While supportive of the introduction of travel corridors, the committee urged the Government to publish the information on which it bases its decisions. It welcomed the restrictions imposed on those travelling to Spain but added: "This has undoubtedly been extremely difficult for many travellers who paid for holidays in Spain following Government guidance in the expectation that they would be able to return to work, caring responsibilities, medical appointments or family events on their return. "There should be significant changes to the way such decisions are handled and communicated in future." The MPs also recommended the Government should investigate the viability of widespread or targeted testing at the border which is in place in countries like Iceland, Hong Kong and South Korea. They were “unconvinced” by Home Office estimates that the compliance rate for quarantine was 99.9 per cent. A Government spokesman said: “The Home Affairs Select Committee are incorrect in their assertions. All of our decisions throughout the pandemic have been guided by the science, with appropriate measures introduced at the right time to keep us all safe. “And with passengers numbers significantly reduced, the scientific advice was clear that quarantine measures for those entering the country from abroad would be most effective when the UK has a lower level of infection. “Therefore, as the virus was brought under control here, border measures were introduced on June 8 to protect public health and help avoid a second peak that would overwhelm the NHS.”




  • UN experts: North Korea flouts sanctions on nukes, missiles

    UN experts: North Korea flouts sanctions on nukes, missilesU.N. experts say North Korea is flouting U.N. sanctions by expanding its nuclear arsenal and ballistic missile program and by exporting coal and illegally importing refined petroleum products in excess of its annual quota. The experts said in key sections of a report obtained Tuesday by The Associated Press that North Korea has also evaded sanctions through “targeted” cyber attacks against officials of countries on the U.N. Security Council and on members of its expert panel. In the report to the Security Council, the experts said North Korea has maintained its nuclear facilities and continues to produce fissile material, including highly enriched uranium, that can be used in nuclear weapons.




  • Trump says generals feel Beirut blast was likely an 'attack'

    Trump says generals feel Beirut blast was likely an 'attack'President Donald Trump said U.S. military generals have told him that they “seem to feel” the massive explosion that rocked Beirut on Tuesday, killing at least 70 people, was a “terrible attack” likely caused by a bomb. Trump was asked why he called it an attack and not an accident, especially since Lebanese officials say they have not determined the cause of the explosion. Trump offered condolences to the victims and said the United States stood ready to assist Lebanon.




  • U.N. chief: World faces 'generational catastrophe' from school closings

    U.N. chief: World faces 'generational catastrophe' from school closingsUnited Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres warned Tuesday that the world faces a “generational catastrophe” because so many schools have been closed because of the coronavirus pandemic. “The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the largest disruption of education ever,” the U.N. chief said. The pandemic has killed nearly 700,000 people across the globe.




  • Chasm grows between Trump and government coronavirus experts

    Chasm grows between Trump and government coronavirus expertsIn the early days of the coronavirus crisis, President Donald Trump was flanked in the White House briefing room by a team of public health experts in a seeming portrait of unity to confront the disease that was ravaging the globe. Trump and his political advisers insist that the United States has no rival in its response to the pandemic. “Right now, I think it’s under control,” Trump said during an interview with Axios.




  • AP PHOTOS: Terror, death, devastation in Lebanon explosion

    AP PHOTOS: Terror, death, devastation in Lebanon explosionAs they watched a huge mushroom cloud rise over the seaport capital, many who felt the massive explosion in Beirut on Tuesday thought it was a nuclear detonation. Others described the popping and bursting of fireworks and a raging fire that spread to another building, triggering the blast felt kilometers (miles) away. The explosion collapsed balconies, shattered windows and ripped bricks from buildings, killing more than 70 people and injuring more than 3,000.




  • UNIFIL ship docked in Beirut port was damaged and naval peacekeepers were injured


  • Trump encourages mail voting in key battleground Florida

    Trump encourages mail voting in key battleground FloridaIn an abrupt reversal, President Donald Trump now is encouraging voters in the critical swing state of Florida to vote by mail after months of criticizing the practice, and only days after threatening to sue Nevada over a new vote-by-mail law. Democrats currently have about 1.9 million Floridians signed up to vote by mail this November, almost 600,000 more than the Republicans’ 1.3 million, according to the Florida Secretary of State.




  • Up to 10,000 Covid-infected people entered UK to fuel spread of disease after Government lifted restrictions, say MPs

    Up to 10,000 Covid-infected people entered UK to fuel spread of disease after Government lifted restrictions, say MPsFailure to introduce quarantine at the start of the outbreak saw up to 10,000 infected people enter the UK, accelerating the spread of disease, an investigation by MPs have said. The all-party home affairs committee today (Wed) said the Government’s “inexplicable” decision to lift restrictions on some one million people who arrived in the UK between March 13 and lockdown on March 23 contributed to the pace and scale of the Covid-19 outbreak in Britain They said this “highly unusual approach” to the pandemic contrasted with other countries from Singapore and New Zealand to Spain which were at the time introducing more comprehensive measures including quarantine and self-isolation for international arrivals. Leading experts from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine told the MPs that they calculated up to 10,000 infected people largely from Spain, France and Italy - including families returning from half-term breaks - imported Covid-19 into the UK. This was confirmed by Sir Patrick Vallance, the Government's chief scientific officer, who pointed to evidence that hundreds of different strains of Covid-19 were brought into the UK after the Government abandoned special measures for international arrivals on March 13. "The UK's experience of Covid-19 has been far worse as a result of the Government's decision not to require quarantine during March, which would have reduced the number of imported infections," said the MPs. “Evidence shows it is highly likely that uncontrolled importations of the virus from European countries contributed to the rapid increase in the spread of the virus in mid-March, and the overall scale of the outbreak in the UK. “The failure to have any special border measures during this period was a serious mistake that significantly increased both the pace and the scale of the epidemic in the UK, and meant that many more people caught COVID-19.” From mid February until March 13, the Government told arrivals from countries including China, Iran and South Korea to self-isolate even if asymptomatic. A second category of countries such as Japan, Malaysia and Northern Italy recommended self-isolation if people developed symptoms. These were abandoned in favour of voluntary “stay at home” guidance until full, legally-enforced lockdown was introduced on March 23. The committee, however, said it “did not accept the argument that the introduction of voluntary ‘stay at home’ guidance for households with possible coronavirus infection on 13 March was enough reason to withdraw all guidance for returning travellers or visitors. “Nor do we accept that falling numbers of arrivals justified the lifting of border measures in mid-March.” The committee said it was "very critical" of the lack of transparency over Government border decisions. It raised concerns about the scientific advice being provided and said ministers appeared to make decisions without "critical information" being available. It was still not clear who was responsible for some decisions and on what basis they were being made, and no Cabinet minister or official has so far been able to provide an explanation, according to the report. The committee said it had been "unable to find any scientific basis or analysis behind the decision to lift border controls on March 13", which it branded "unacceptable" after making nine different formal requests for information and despite Government promises to make this available. While supportive of the introduction of travel corridors, the committee urged the Government to publish the information on which it bases its decisions. It welcomed the restrictions imposed on those travelling to Spain but added: "This has undoubtedly been extremely difficult for many travellers who paid for holidays in Spain following Government guidance in the expectation that they would be able to return to work, caring responsibilities, medical appointments or family events on their return. "There should be significant changes to the way such decisions are handled and communicated in future." The MPs also recommended the Government should investigate the viability of widespread or targeted testing at the border which is in place in countries like Iceland, Hong Kong and South Korea. They were “unconvinced” by Home Office estimates that the compliance rate for quarantine was 99.9 per cent.




  • Minneapolis mayor: City seeks right mentors for new officers



 SfD Poll
SfD back online
don't care
great!
SfD what?
where have you been?
not needed
View Results

 Web Search
Google

 Calendar
Previous Month  August 2020  Next Month
S M T W T F S
            1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
         

Full Calendar

©2003-2016 Students for Democracy |  Site Launched: July 21, 2003

StudentsforDemocracy's validated RSS 2.0 feed

Warning: This text and the email address is not visible in a browser! Do not ever send any emails to:
advcwfda@contact.studentsfordemocracy.org